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Free Culture and Innovation

Johanna Blakely, who serves as a Deputy Director at a media-focused think tank at USC, gave what I think is one of the best talks on this issue at TED. In a nutshell, her argument is: fashion’s free-for-all culture drives trends, which in turn, pushes innovation. In other words, fashion evolves like this: one company introduces a risky, but good design, and when it proves successful in the market, other high-end designers copy it. This creates a trend. Eventually, the trend becomes safe enough for mass-market fashion retailers to copy (since they have to wait until they can move millions, not just dozens, of units). These retailers milk it for all its worth, and when high-street consumers start wearing the style, early-adopters move on to other things (perhaps out of snobbishness, or just not wanting to pay top dollar to look like everyone else). This gives those earlier experimental brands an incentive to innovate. As Blakely puts it, without this free-for-all copying culture, the world of fashion would be much less vibrant. 

Naturally, the argument is not without its opponents. This week, The New York Times hosted a discussion on intellectual property rights in fashion, and a few writers argued that the industry needs much stronger protections. Admittedly, I wasn’t terribly convinced by their arguments, but one good point they did touch on is that, when a big brand rips off a smaller company, it can be a devastating blow to a young designer, who can’t afford to have the wind taken out of his or her sails. Those “hot trend” moments can make or break their career. 

Of course, there are also the ethics surrounding intellectual property, which is a separate (and perhaps more thorny) issue. One thing is for sure, however — we as fashion consumers can avoid the kind of knockoffs with fake luxury labels (the kind sold in those downtown alleys), but it’s almost impossible to not wear something that has stolen a bit of design from somewhere else. When Oprah asked Ralph Lauren in 2011 how he’s been able to keep designing for so many years, he answered: “You copy. Forty-five years of copying; that’s why I’m here.”

whatdoiwear:

Jason Wu Spring 2015 Ready-to-Wear Collection
Photos: Style, for more runway gifs click HERE

whatdoiwear:

Jason Wu Spring 2015 Ready-to-Wear Collection

Photos: Style, for more runway gifs click HERE

(Source: whatdoiwear)

senyahearts:

Zimmermann - Spring/Summer 2015 RTW 
Model: Josephine Skriver

senyahearts:

Zimmermann - Spring/Summer 2015 RTW 

Model: Josephine Skriver

glamour:

Photos via Olivia Bee on Flickr *Glamour

Equestrian glam and dandelion diva fierceness! 

lelaid:

Christy Turlington by Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel F/W 1991

Throwback Thursday X Chanel 

lelaid:

Christy Turlington by Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel F/W 1991

Throwback Thursday X Chanel